American and Canadian Cats

Andean Mountain Cat (Leopardus jacobita)

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Also known as: Andean Cat or Mountain cat.
Conservation status:  Endangered.
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Size: The adult Andean Mountain cat is 22 to 65 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 16-18 inches. It weighs roughly between 3-5 kg.
Colour and markings: Silvery grey base coat with dark brown spots and stripes.
Distribution: It is believed to live high in the Andean mountains of Peru, Bolivia, Chile and Argentina.
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Prey: Chinchillas and Viscachas and possibly small birds and reptiles.
Threats:  Hunted for its fur. Lack of research knowledge.
CAT-FACT: There is not even one Andean Mountain cat in the captivity (at time of writing)

video  Andean Mountain Cat – Video Footage

Cat Specific Research and fund raising: Andean Cat Alliance
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Bobcat (Lynx rufus)

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Conservation status: Least concern
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Size:  The adult bobcat is 25 to 39 in long from the head to the base of the tail; the stubby tail adds a further 5-6 inches and its “bobbed” appearance gives the species its name. It weighs roughly between 7-18 kg.
Colour and markingsLight grey base coat with black or dark brown spots or bars.

volume-24-512 Bobcat Call

Distribution:  Southern Canada to Northern Mexico
Bobcat_Lynx_rufus_distribution_map
Prey:  Rabbits, Hares, domestic poultry, rodents, small deer.
Threats:  Hunted for its fur and trapped and hunted for humans for sport
CAT-FACTBobcats typically have one main den in their territory and several smaller dens. The main den is often in a cave. Smaller dens might just be a few rocks or an old tree stump.

videoBobcat – Video footage

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Canadian Lynx (Lynx canadensis)

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Also known as: North American Lynx.
Conservation status:  Least concern.
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Size:  The adult Canadian Lynx is 28 to 39 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 4-5 inches. It weighs roughly between 8.5 – 16 kg.
Colour and markingsYellowish grey coat with dark brown spots.
Distribution:  Northern forests of Canada & Alaska.
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Prey:  Hares, rodents, birds & sometimes larger prey such as deer.
Threats:  The Canada lynx is trapped for its fur and has declined in many areas due to habitat loss.
CAT-FACT: The name Lynx comes from the Greek word “to shine,” in reference to the reflective ability of the cat’s eyes.

videoCanadian Lynx – Video Footage

Cat Specific Research and fund raising: Project Lynx
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Geoffroys Cat (Leopardus geoffroyi)

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Conservation status:  Least Concern
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SizeThe adult Geoffroy’s cat is 17 to 27 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 9-14 inches. It weighs roughly between 2-6 kg. All in all not very different to a domestic house cat.
Colour and markingsSilvery grey coat with round black spots that merge into stripes
Distribution: Scrub regions of Bolivia, Argentina, southern Brazil and Paraguay in South America
Leopardus_geoffroyi_range_map
Prey: Rodents, Lizards, frogs and sometimes fish.
Threats:  Fur Trade.
CAT-FACT: Geoffroy’s cat is named after the 19th century French zoologist Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire.

videoGeoffroys Cat – video footage

Cat Specific Research and fund raisingFeline Conservation
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Jaguarundi (Puma yegouaroundi)

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Also known as: Otter cat, Eyra cat and in Spanish speaking countries gato colorado, gato moro, león brenero, onza, tigrillo, and leoncillo.
Conservation status:  Least Concern.
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SizeThe adult Jaguarundi is 20 to 33 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 11-20 inches. It weighs roughly between 3-6.5 kg.
Colour and markingsRed, brown or grey coat with no markings.
volume-24-512 Jaguarundi Call
Distribution: Southern USA to Argentina.
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Prey: Rodents, reptiles and birds.
Threats:  Loss of habitat.
CAT-FACT: Often called an ‘otter cat’ It is not uncommon to see Jaguarundi living up to their name by swimming and even diving into water to catch fish.

video Jaguarundi – Video footage

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Kodkod (Leopardus guigna)

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Also known as: Güiña.
Conservation status:  Vulnerable.
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Size: The adult Kodkod is 15 to 20 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 7-9 inches. It weighs roughly between 1.4-3 kg. The Kodkod is considered the smallest of the small wild cats.
Colour and markingsGrey-brown coat heavily marked with spots.
Distribution: Patagonia and Chile.
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Prey:  Birds, rodents and small lizards.
Threats:  Logging of his forest habitat.
CAT-FACTS: The Kodkod is the smallest type of wild cat in the western hemisphere. It is thought to be cathemeral, meaning its active both during the day and at night.

videoKodkod – video footage

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Margay (Leopardus wiedii)

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Also know as: Tree Ocelot.
Conservation status:  Near Threatened.
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Size: The adult Margay is 18.5 to 31 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 13-20 inches. It weighs roughly between 2.5-4 kg.
Colour and markingsYellow grey to tawny yellow buff with dark brown spots with shaded centers.
Distribution: Mexico through to Northern Argentina.
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Prey:  Small mammals, birds, reptiles and even eggs.
Threats:  Loss of habitat.
CAT-FACT: When hunting Margay’s have been known to mimic the distress call of their prey (a Pied Tamarin in this instance) to try and lure them into catching distance. They also have special ankles that allow their feet to twist 180 degrees enabling them to climb down tress as easy as they climb up them.

video Margay Video

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Ocelot (Leopardus pardalis)

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Also known as: Dwarf leopard.
Conservation status:  Least Concern.
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Size: The adult Ocelot is 25 to 39 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 10-16 inches. It weighs roughly between 7 – 14 kg.
Colour and markingsPale grey coat with solid and open dark spots and bars.

volume-24-512    Ocelot call

Distribution: South and Central America.
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Prey:  Small mammals, birds, reptiles and fish.
Threats: Loss of habitat, introduction of roads.
CAT-FACT: Salvador Dalí had a pet Ocelot called Babou (We would have thought he’d have known better than to have a wild animal as a pet!).

videoOcelot – video footage

Cat Specific Research and fund raising: S.P.E.C.I.E.S.
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Oncilla  (Leopardus tigrinus)

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Also known as:  Northern tiger cat or Tigrillo.
Conservation status: Vulnerable.
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Size: The adult Oncilla is 15.5 to 21 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 9-15 inches. It weighs roughly between 1.75 – 2.75 kg.
Colour and markingsFawn or tawny yellow buff with dark brown or black spots and rosettes.
Distribution: Widely distributed across Central and South America.
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Prey: Small mammals, rodents, birds, lizards and even eggs.
Threats: Loss of habitat through deforestation and hunted for their pelts.
CAT-FACTOne fifth of all Oncillas are completely black. This type of Oncilla usually inhabits more dense parts of the forests.

videoOncilla – Video footage

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Pampas Cat (Leopardus colocolo)

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Also known as: Colocolo cat.
Conservation status: Not Threatened.
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Size: The adult Pampas cat is 20 to 27 inches long from the head to the base of the tail; the tail adds a further 8.5 – 12 inches. It weighs roughly between 3 – 6.5 kg.
Colour and markingsPale silvery grey coat with red/grey stripes and spots.
Distribution: West side of South America.
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CAT-FACT: In the language of the local people this cat is called gato pajero. Gato means cat and “pajero” refers to the grass in the area that is called pampas grass.
Prey: Small mammals, guinea pigs and ground birds.
Threats: Loss of habitat.

videoPampas Cat – Video footage

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